A balance of global & local
       
     
 The new Chinese Band-Aid logo, shown on new packaging concepts. To the right of it is the English standard (minimized for the China market) and below, the English and Chinese wordmarks of the parent company, Johnson & Johnson.
       
     
Highlighting a cultural ideal
       
     
 New logo design of Nongfu Spring, as seen on a transparent bottle.
       
     
Turning a Chinese character into an icon
       
     
 The new Forever icon is flexible enough to work as a distinct visual element on a complex surface and when only partially shown. This is advantageous as it is common to numerous logos on a single vehicle as a decorative element and in widely different sizes.
       
     
A balance of global & local
       
     
A balance of global & local

Band-Aid's old Chinese wordmark was inconsistent with the primary English (global) standard; it is missing the clarity and sense of trusted authority that "Band-Aid" conveys. The second character 廸 also needed to be updated to a more modern version. This design—as with many Chinese wordmarks—required a delicate balance of adherence to a corporate standard and of a respect towards Chinese calligraphic traditions.

In the new design, the characters have gained much-needed confidence through consistent line weights; appropriate weighting and interplay of the strokes; and balanced white-spaces. All this was achieved while also incorporating unique visual elements of the English standard, such as the hyphen and the open bowls of the letters B and D.

 The new Chinese Band-Aid logo, shown on new packaging concepts. To the right of it is the English standard (minimized for the China market) and below, the English and Chinese wordmarks of the parent company, Johnson & Johnson.
       
     

The new Chinese Band-Aid logo, shown on new packaging concepts. To the right of it is the English standard (minimized for the China market) and below, the English and Chinese wordmarks of the parent company, Johnson & Johnson.

Highlighting a cultural ideal
       
     
Highlighting a cultural ideal

Nong Fu ("Farmer") Spring—one of the largest bottled water brands in China—uses three mountain peaks as main visuals, but it is quite similar in content to Evian.

In the new design, the center mountain doubles as a farmer's bamboo hat and a river flows down like the hat's string—tied below his chin—emphasizing the farmer's hard work and respected, idealized status (akin to the "everyman") in Chinese culture. Finally, the blue-to-yellow gradient reflects the conventional farming seasons.

 New logo design of Nongfu Spring, as seen on a transparent bottle.
       
     

New logo design of Nongfu Spring, as seen on a transparent bottle.

Turning a Chinese character into an icon
       
     
Turning a Chinese character into an icon

The Shanghai Forever brand has its roots in building wartime bicycles for the masses. Today, it has diversified into other personal mobility products such as electrical scooters and mopeds. As such, its 1980s logo—a bicycle silhouette formed by its Chinese name, Yong Jiu—no longer encompasses its portfolio and future plans.

The new logo simplifies the Forever brand into a single character, yong. (The original two characters, meaning "forever long", can be considered redundant.) This turns the brand into a much bolder icon that can be easily identified on products and in print.

 The new Forever icon is flexible enough to work as a distinct visual element on a complex surface and when only partially shown. This is advantageous as it is common to numerous logos on a single vehicle as a decorative element and in widely different sizes.
       
     

The new Forever icon is flexible enough to work as a distinct visual element on a complex surface and when only partially shown. This is advantageous as it is common to numerous logos on a single vehicle as a decorative element and in widely different sizes.